Goodbye winter, hello spring

Credit : Scoopdyga

Thursday 21 March - 11h26 | Maxence Magnin

Goodbye winter, hello spring

Yesterday, March 19, marked the official start of spring (although it may feel more or less like that depending on your location). Good news for all horse lovers who will be able to practice their sport or hobby more enjoyably after long winter months when riding has been difficult – and sometimes impossible. As the seasons change, here is a shortlist of things we are happy to leave behind, but also rediscover.

So long, winter

So long, winter - Goodbye winter, hello spring

Credit : Scoopdyga

Mud. After the winter season and its months-long alternating wet and dry weather, mud bids farewell until next year. A true relief for riders and horses, who can finally resume a  somewhat normal life. Indeed, while it is annoying for riders who regularly ruin their boots or shoes, horses also prefer dry ground, especially for making mischief in the paddock or meadow.
Cold. Obviously, freezing temperatures also give way to more mild and pleasant conditions in which to practice one's passion wearing only a light sweater. And horses also have a lighter load, losing one or two blankets from their backs.
Equine energy. Whoever says cold also says energy. In fact, during the winter horses need to warm up in any way they can can. This often results in a surplus of energetic kicking and bucking to help their body warm up against the cold. But this kind of situation is not overly enjoyable for their riders in the long run, especially with the outsized power of some horses.
Winter coat. While horses and ponies are indifferent about the issue, riders are happy to see their partners' big winter coats – and the obligation to groom them – disappear. But since spring is also the time when coats are shed, collecting hair that has fallen to the ground or clung to clothing becomes a new activity.

Hello spring

Hello spring - Goodbye winter, hello spring

Credit : Scoopdyga

The return outdoors. With the cold, moisture and mud disappearing, horses and riders can return finally outdoors. This translates into more time in the paddock or meadow for the horses, but also return journeys home through forests or fields for trekking, endurance or cross-country riders, for example. In short, normal activity resumes.
Competitions. The end of winter also marks the end of the winter competition break. Spring is thus an opportunity to find out if the exercises of the winter season will bear fruit at upcoming equestrian showdowns.
The sun. During the winter, sunlight can be scarce, even rare. With the return of good weather, riding under blue skies in the sunshine (even with cool temperatures) is always good for the morale. Especially (as the days lengthen) as it helps optimize one's time on horseback. In short, the equestrian world is happy to see spring poking its head out again,

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